Beatriz Da Costa

Specimens and diagrams featuring endangered bird species, presented in a large gallery space.
Beatriz da Costa, Dark Places, A Memorial for the Still Living, 2009
A gallery showing three taxidermied pigeons presented on plinths and a projection of a film.
Beatriz da Costa, Interspecies, PigeonBlog, 2008
Beatriz da Costa, A Memorial for the Still Living, Flora View, 2010.
Beatriz da Costa, A Memorial for the Still Living, Flora View, 2010.
Specimens and diagrams featuring endangered bird species, presented in a large gallery space.
Beatriz da Costa, A Memorial for the Still Living, 2009.
Beatriz da Costa was an interdisciplinary artist, based in Los Angeles, who worked at the intersection of art, politics, engineering and the life sciences. Da Costa’s work usually took the form of public participatory interventions, locative media, conceptual tool building and critical writing. In 2010, Beatriz presented “A Memorial for the Still Living” at the Horniman Museum in London, a project commissioned by The Arts Catalyst as part of the Dark Places project. The exhibition showcased British animal and plant species on the edge of extinction, focusing on “still living” species. The ‘dark place’ refers to the storage rooms of the museum and consequential oblivion, sparingly illuminated by memories of the dwindling few who have encountered the specimens over the years. To realize this exhibition, da Costa worked in collaboration with collection curators at the Horniman Museum and the Natural History Museum in London. In the exhibition, taxidermied specimens of endangered animals lay alongside botanical samples of plants under threat. Each specimen was given a “birth date” (the date of classification and inclusion into the corpus of western science) as well as a “death date” (the date of projected extinction).