Transformism

Transformism, new commissions by two artists, Melanie Jackson and Revital Cohen. 

Both artists, through their distinctive practices, have made new works exploring their interests in how cultural archetypes and ideas interweave with science and technology to create new shapes, visual forms and structures.

As we develop the tools to manipulate and engineer new forms and systems of life, the exhibition considers our historical and contemporary entanglements with nature, technology and the economy, and how these relationships influence emergent forms in biological and synthetic matter, through new sculpture, installation and moving image works.

The Urpflanze (Part 2) is the second part of Melanie Jackson’s ongoing investigation into mutability and transformation that takes its lead from Goethe’s concept of an imaginary primal plant, the Urpflanze, that contained coiled up within it the potential to unfurl all possible future forms. Contemporary science likewise imagines the potential to grow or print any form we can imagine, by recasting physical, chemical and biological function as a substrate that can be programmed into being. Jackson’s work begins in the botanical garden and looks to the laboratory, from clay pits to the factory floor, from analogue to digital clay, from its own animated pixels to the interior of the screen in a series of moving image works and ceramic sculptures. She has collaborated with Esther Leslie on a text that has informed the work and a new publication, THE UR-PHENOMENON, that will be distributed as part of the exhibition.

In Kingyo Kingdom, Revital Cohen, whose projects often test the ethical parameters of biological design, explores the genus of fish that have been designed for aesthetic purposes, questioning the definitions used to indicate living creatures. Does one denominate a manipulated organism as an object, product, animal or pet? What consequences does this entail for our feelings and behaviours? Cohen’s interest in the cultural perceptions and aesthetics of animal-as-product took her to Japan where exotic goldfish have been developed over centuries of meticulous cultivation; breeding out dorsal fins and sculpting kimono-like Ranchu fish tails. Kingyo Kingdom explores the unique culture of breeders, collectors and connoisseurs with footage from the Japanese national goldfish competition, questioning the design and commodification of this species.

The exhibition's Reading Room includes:

  • Paola Antonelli, Talk to Me: Design and the Communication between People and Objects
  • Jane Bennet, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things
  • Diana H. Coole, Smantha Frost, NewMaterialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics
  • Michel Houellebecq, Atomised
  • Esther Leslie, Synthetic Worlds: Nature, Art and the Chemical Industry
  • Daniel Miller, Materiality (Politics, History, and Culture)
  • William Myers, Bio Design: Nature Science and Creativity
  • Harry Pearson, Racing Pigs and Giant Marrows: Travels around the north country fairs
  • Kazuya Takaoka, Kingyo: The Artistry of Japanese Goldfish

Publication

An illustrated exhibition guide with an essay by Isobel Harbison will be available in print and as a free eBook download.

Events

26 January, Opening and Crafting Life: Materiality, Science and Technology symposium

Read reviews

Designo.daily
Nicola Triscott blog
AnimalNewyork blog

Biographical information

Melanie Jackson
Melanie Jackson inhabits different tropes of art making to interrogate possibilities of representation against the engaged practices of the world. She is interested in ways in which thought and affect is conducted through the material, and much of her work has explored this against the context of work, production and the flow of international capital.  She is currently investigating the relationships between nature and technology through a series of experiments with fauna and flora, and the technologies available to her. Melanie is a lecturer at Slade School of Fine Art, her solo exhibitions include The Urpflanze (Part 1), The Drawing Room, London (2010), Road Angel, Arnolfini, Bristol (2007), Made In China, Matt’s Gallery, London (2005).  She won the Jerwood Drawing Prize in 2007.

Revital Cohen
Revital Cohen is an artist and designer who develops critical objects and provocative scenarios exploring the juxtaposition of the natural with the artificial. Her work spans across various mediums and includes collaborations with scientists, bioethicists, animal breeders and physicians. Since establishing her studio in 2008, she has been exhibiting and lecturing internationally within varied contexts and locations - from scientific and academic conferences to art galleries and design fairs. She is the current winner of the Science Museum’s Emerging Artist Commission.

Supported by

Melanie Jackson's commission has been supported by a Wellcome Trust Arts Award and the Slade School of Fine Art and Revital Cohen’s by S-Air Japan. Transformism is funded by Arts Council England.

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Half-Life

Artist Chris Oakley's short film (2008) explored the intricacies and ambivalent legacy of nuclear power.

Oakley's Half-Life looks at the histories of Harwell, birthplace of the UK nuclear industry, and the development of fusion energy technology at the Culham facility in Oxfordshire. Produced with the co-operation of both these organisations, the film examines nuclear science research through a historical and cultural filter. Drawing on archive footage of the sites, alongside contemporary materials, the work takes structural clues from nuclear physics, exploring the heritage of nuclear energy from the roots of the technology that drove the industrial revolution.

The relationship between nature, and our reliance on mineral energy resources, and the portrayal of the often-mundane realities of nuclear research seek to ‘normalise’ emotionally driven debates around the subject. With the recent widespread acceptance of the reality of climate change driven by carbon dioxide emissions, the work explores the realities and myths surrounding the nuclear sciences.' Half-Life featured in Nuclear: Art and Radioactivity, 2008 and at the artist panel discussion, Nuclear Culture on Film, 28 April, 2013 at Arts Catalyst, London.

Commissioned by Arts Catalyst and SCAN

A trailer of Half-Life can be seen here

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Nuclear Culture Project

A curatorial research project led by Ele Carpenter, associate curator at Arts Catalyst, in partnership with Goldsmiths College, University of London

The Nuclear Culture Project is a curatorial exploration of nuclear culture, which began with considering the conceptual and cultural challenges of dismantling nuclear submarines in the UK, inviting artists to consider the aesthetic, conceptual, ethical and cultural concerns of nuclear submarines in conjunction with experts in the field. The project is bringing together scientists, engineers and community activists with artists and ethicists to develop new opportunities for creative practice investigating nuclear culture. Specific areas of enquiry include: the invisibility of the nuclear economy, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant meltdown, geological waste storage, the Anthropocene, and nuclear humanities.

Activities

The project involves artists’ field trips, commissioning new work and curating exhibitions, film screenings and interdisciplinary symposia, and public events and talks. Three groups of artists are developing new work in response to the culture of submarines, decay rates, and the architectures of decision-making: Jon Thomson & Alison Craighead; Nick Crowe & Ian Rawlinson; and Lise Autogena.

Key areas of the research are discussed in a report on the Nuclear Culture Symposium co-authored by Ele Carpenter & Jantine Schroeder, Antwerp Uni. 2013, available here

Nuclear Culture website

The Nuclear Culture website publishes research articles, reviews, interviews and information about creative research, field trips and art practice.

Public Exhibitions & Events

Actinium, exhibition & forum, S-AIR, OYOYO Sapporo, Japan, July 2014. Supported by the Daiwa Foundation
Panning for Atomic Gold, symposium, Arts Catalyst, 17 May 2014
Nuclear Culture, workshop and film screenings, Arts Catalyst, April 2013

Artists Field Trips

  • Tomari Nuclear Power Plant & Horonobe Underground Research Lab, Hokkaido, Japan, 2014
  • S-AIR Sapporo, Aichi Triennale, Japan, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • LLW Ltd, Cumbria, UK, Jon Thomson, Alison Craighead, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • Cove Park Residency, Rosneath Peninsula, Scotland, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • HMS Courageous, Devonport Plymouth, UK. Nick Crowe, Ian Rawlinson, Susan Schuppli, Lucia Garavaglia, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • MoDeRN Conference, EU Commission, Luxembourg, Nick Crowe, Ele Carpenter, 2013
  • Aldermaston Womens’ Peace Camp, UK, Lise Autogena, Ele Carpenter, 2012

Nuclear Culture Research Group

The Nuclear Culture Research Group is a an interdisciplinary group of artists, curators and scholars in the nuclear arts and humanities convened by Goldsmiths College, University of London, in partnership with Arts Catalyst.

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Wrecked on the Intertidal Zone

Wrecked on the Intertidal Zone, a series of investigations into the Thames Estuary


Follow the progress of the project on the Wrecked website.


The Thames estuary is a complex collection of objects, atmospheres and flows that cannot readily be reduced to scientific methods and models. The estuary is changing rapidly with new industrial infrastructure in construction, including the largest container port in the UK. The estuary's sea marshes, tidal flats and muddy waters are critical wilderness zones for biodiversity conservation and species migration. Simultaneously, they are also zones for leisure and tourism, fishing grounds and the sites of historic wrecks.

This exploratory project, led by YoHa and Arts Catalyst, brings together a network of local people with artists and technologists to explore how local "situated" knowledge of the estuary can be combined with artistic investigations and citizen science techniques to explore and respond to a changing contested estuary.

Through a series of participatory workshops, public realm art projects and activities, which began in Summer 2014 and will continue at least to Summer 2016, Wrecked on the Intertidal Zone will profile ways of structuring information from situated knowledge (bird watchers, fishermen, mud walkers, amateur ecologists) and verifiable methods (monitoring networks and ambient sensors).

By fostering an ecology of practices, Wrecked on the Intertidal Zone aims to generate a critical interest in the complex influences governing these delicate environments.

Participating artists include YoHa, Fran Gallardo, Critical Art Ensemble and Andy Freeman.

 

 

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Moon Stories and Make it to the Moon family workshops

Family workshops at Bargehouse as part of the programme for younger visitors to Republic of the Moon exhibition


Make it to the Moon
Sunday 12 January, 2pm – 5pm
Make it to the Moon, drop in family workshops led by artist and ESERO-UK Space Ambassador Helen Schell. 
Imagine a mission to the moon and using various art and craft techniques design and make space diaries, logbooks, rocket manuals, moon flags and mission badges. (5–11 years.  Must be accompanied by an adult.)

Moon Stories
Sunday 19 January, 2.30pm – 4.30pm
Moon Stories, family workshop with Moon Vehicle project leader Joanna Griffin.
Join a space adventure re-enacting the history of moon landings, making space vehicles and a light-based lunar installation for a new mission. (Suitable for ages 8+)

 

Support

Republic of the Moon is a touring exhibition, commissioned by Arts Catalyst with FACT. The first version of the exhibition was presented at FACT Liverpool in winter 2012. The exhibition and residency has been made possible with Grants for the Arts support from Arts Council England and Science & Technology Facilities Council.
Bargehouse is owned and managed by social enterprise, Coin Street Community Builders: www.coinstreet.org
 

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SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe Modern Ruins 1:220

The spectacular SEFT-1 is a road and rail vehicle created by Mexican artists and brothers Ivan Puig and Andrés Padilla Domene, known together as Los Ferronautas.

Ivan Puig and Andrés Padilla Domene (Los Ferronautas) built their striking silver road-rail SEFT-1 vehicle to explore the abandoned passenger railways of Mexico and Ecuador, capturing their journeys in videos, photographs and collected objects.

In their first London exhibition, SEFT-1 Abandoned Railways Exploration Probe: Modern Ruins 1:220, commissioned by The Arts Catalyst and presented in partnership with Furtherfield Gallery, in the heart of Finsbury Park, the artists explore how the ideology of progress is imprinted onto historic landscapes and reflect on the two poles of the social experience of technology - use and obsolescence.

Between 2010 and 2012, the artists travelled across Mexico and Ecuador in the SEFT-1 (Sonda de Exploración Ferroviaria Tripulada or Manned Railway Exploration Probe). In a transdisciplinary art project, they set out to explore disused railways as a starting point for reflection and research, recording the landscapes and infrastructure, stories and testimonials around and between cities. Interviewing people they met, often from communities isolated by Mexico’s passenger railway closures, they shared their findings online, http://www.seft1.com, where audiences could track the probe’s trajectory, view maps and images and listen to interviews.

The artists’ journeys led them to the notion of modern ruins: places and systems left behind quite recently, not because they weren’t functional, but for a range of political and economical reasons. In the second half of the 19th century, the Mexican government partnered with British companies to built the railway line that would connect Mexico City with the Atlantic Ocean – and beyond to Europe. This iconic railway infrastructure now lies in ruins, much of it abandoned due to the privatisation of the railway system in 1995, when many passenger trains were withdrawn, lines cut off and communities isolated.

For this new exhibition, the artists are inviting British expert model railway constructors to collaborate by creating scale reproductions of specific Mexican railway ruins, originally built by British companies, exactly as they are now. One gallery becomes a space for the process of model ruin construction. The room’s walls will show the pictures, documents, plans and other materials used as reference for the meticulously elaborated ruin construction. With this action a dystopian time tunnel is created.

The SEFT-1 exploration probe will be on display next to the gallery 20–22 June, 11–13 July, 18–20 July and 25–27 July 2014.

The Artists

Ivan Puig (born 1977, Guadalajara, MX) has exhibited internationally in Mexico, Germany, Canada, Brazil and the United States. He is the recipient of a number of awards and residencies including the BBVA Bancomer Foundation Grant for the SEFT-1 project (2010-2011) and the Cisneros Fontanals Foundation (CIFO) Grant in 2010. Puig, a member of the collective TRiodO (with Marcela Armas and Gilberto Esparza), lives and works in Mexico City.

Andrés Padilla Domene (born 1986 in Guadalajara, MX) has exhibited work in various contexts including ISEA 2012 (Albuquerque, New Mexico), The National Museum of Art MUNAL (Mexico City, 2011), 04 Transitio_MX (Mexico, 2011), and EFRC, Centro de Arte Contemporáneo (Qutio, Ecuador, 2012). His video work as director and producer with Camper Media includes documentaries, fiction films and TV shows.

Support

Presented in partnership with Furtherfield Gallery

With support from Embassy of Mexico, Arts Council England, Central de Maquetas

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'Breaking Down Barriers: Law, Technoscience and Society'

The AHRC Network ‘Technoscience, Law and Society: Interrogating the Nexus’ in partnership with Arts Catalyst

The AHRC Network on ‘Technoscience, Law and Society’ held its inaugural event on the 6 June 2013, organised jointly with Arts Catalyst, providing an opportunity to explore some of the key aspects of the relationships between law, science and society that the Network seeks to interrogate. This discursive event was organised around displays of and introductions to the work of critical artists Carey Young and the Critical Art Ensemble, and academic presentations pertaining to debates in law and science.

Programme:

• Introduction to the AHRC Network by Dr. Emilie Cloatre and Dr. Martyn Pickersgill

• Presentations by Prof. Alain Pottage and Prof. Robert Dingwall

• Presentation by Graham Harwood, YoHa

• Presentation of the work of critical artists Carey Young and Critical Art Ensemble by Nicola Triscott (Arts Catalyst)

• Interactive explorations of the key theoretical, methodological and practical issues that arise when exploring the relationships between science, technology and legal processes

 

 

 

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Mouth of the Thames

Exploratory work around the logics of the Thames Estuary, what gets built and what this might mean for those who live there in a joint project by YoHa, Critical Art Ensemble and Arts Catalyst.

The Thames estuary is a complex collection of objects, atmospheres and flows that cannot readily be reduced to scientific methods and models. The estuary is changing beyond the flows of creeks, the largest container port in the UK is quietly being built on the site of an old oil refinery at Coryton, Essex, dredging a channel 100km east out to sea. London needs a new airport, a new Thames barrier, wind farms. The estuary is changing beyond the flows of creeks, the largest container port in the UK is quietly being built on the site of an old oil refinery at Coryton, Essex, dredging a channel 100km east out to sea. London needs a new airport, a new Thames barrier, wind farms. 

Initial workshop and talk with Steve Kurtz from Critical Art Ensemble talking about how CAE approach their work.

Steve Kurtz & Critical Art Ensemble

Steve Kurtz is a founding member of Critical Art Ensemble, a collective of tactical media practitioners of various specializations including computer graphics and web design, film/video, photography, text art, book art, and performance. Formed in 1987, Critical Art Ensemble's focus has been on the exploration of the intersections between art, critical theory, technology, and political activism. The group has exhibited and performed at diverse venues internationally, ranging from the street, to the museum, to the internet. Museum exhibitions include the Whitney Museum and The New Museum in NYC; The Corcoran Museum in Washington D.C.; The ICA, London; The MCA, Chicago; Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt; Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; and The London Museum of Natural History. The collective has written 6 books.

YoHa

Local artists Graham Harwood and Matsuko Yokokoji (YoHa English translation 'aftermath') have lived and worked together since 1994.   YoHa's graphic vision, technical tinkering, has powered several celebrated collaborations establishing an international reputation for pioneering critical arts projects. Harwood and Yokokoji's co founded the artists group Mongrel (1996-2007)and established the MediaShed a free-media lab (2005-2008). In 2008 theyjoined Richard Wright to produce Tantalum Memorial shown in 9 countries and15 cities over 4 years. In 2010 YoHa produced Coal Fired Computers before embarking on a series of works about the lived logics of database machinery including Invisible Airs in 2011 and Endless War 2012.

Websites

www.critical-art.net/
yoha.co.uk/cfc

www.t-a-p.org.uk/events.html

 

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Ice Diamond and Whistler

New commissions by Torsten Lauschmann for Ice Lab exhibition

Alongside five imaginative designs for Antarctic research stations, Arts Catalyst and British Council have commissioned artist Torsten Lauschmann to make new work for Ice Lab: New Architecture and Science in Antarctica an exhibition that will illustrate how innovative contemporary architecture is enabling scientists to live and work in one of the most extreme environments on our planet.

Torsten Lauschmann's artworks will envelope audiences in a bewitching immersive environment, playfully offering visitors sounds, sights and sensations evoking the disorientating Antarctic landscape. Taking as his inspiration the phenomena of 'whistlers', very low frequency electromagnetic waves recorded in Antarctica, Lauschmann introduces the startling sounds of the frozen continent into the gallery. He extends the experiential atmosphere with a simple yet mesmerising audiovisual journey, Ice Diamond, splicing footage from the British Atlantic Survey research ship James Clark Ross, a vessel that can steam at a steady two knots through sea ice one metre thick, to create a kaleidoscopic vision which he describes as eluding to “the incredible human ingenuity and difficulties in dealing with in this extreme environment.”

Born in Bad Soden, 1970 Lauschmann now lives and works in Glasgow. His idiosyncratic practice using photography, video, sound, drawing, performance and installation is both eccentric and eclectic. Lauschmann merrily experiments with the mathematical, technological and scientific fusing them with comic, fictional, sometimes absurd ideas revealing his boundless curiosity about the World and beyond. From his World Jump Day (2005) participatory performance leap proposed to shift the Earth's orbit, to the intergalactic visions of Father's Monocle and Coy Lover (2012), his art-making explores the real and illusory.

Ice Lab: New Architecture and Science in Antarctica is an international touring exhibition featuring work by Hugh Broughton Architects, bof Architekten, David Garcia, Space Group, International Polar Foundation. It will give visitors a unique view of the inspiration, ingenuity and creativity behind architecture in the coldest, windiest, driest and most isolated place on earth. It opens at Architecture and Design Scotland, The Lighthouse in Glasgow from 26 July-2 October 2013 before touring to Manchester Museum of Science & Industry (21 October-6 January 2014) as part of the Manchester Science Festival.

Events

There will be an associated events programme of talks, workshops and film screenings at both The Lighthouse and at MOSI (TBC)

Publication

Accompanying the exhibition will be a publication with essays written by Dr David Walton (British Antarctic Survey and author of the recent Antarctica: Global Science from a Frozen Continent) and Sam Jab (co-founder of FAT architects, lecturer and writer).

Partners and links

Commissioned and organised by the British Council and curated by Arts Catalyst

Torsten Lauschmann

The Lighthouse

Architecture and Design Scotland

Museum of Science and Industry

We Made That

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Ice Lab: New Architecture and Science in Antarctica

Ice Lab presents some of the most innovative and progressive examples of contemporary architecture in Antarctica. 

The first exhibition of its kind, it will draw together projects that not only utilise cutting-edge technology and engineering, but have equally considered aesthetics, sustainability and human needs in their ground-breaking designs for research stations.

Initiated by the British Council and curated by Arts Catalyst, Ice Lab features four international projects: Halley VI, UK (Hugh Brougton Architects) Princess Elizabeth, Belgium (International Polar Foundation), Bharati, India (bof architekten/IMS), Jang Bogo, South Korea (Space Group), and the Iceberg Living Station (MAP Architects) – a speculative design for a future research station to be entirely made from compacted snow.

The visually rich exhibition also highlights the diverse science that takes place on the frozen continent – from collecting 4.5 billion year old meteorites that illuminate how the solar system was formed to drilling ice cores whose bubbles of ancient air reveal the earth’s climate history; from cutting edge astronomy peering into the world’s clearest skies to studying its Dry Valleys, the closest thing to ‘Mars on Earth’.

Torsten Lauschmann has made two a new audio and light works, 'Whistler' and 'Ice Diamond', in response to a commission from Arts Catalyst especially for the exhibition.  The Glasgow-based artist will create this work in collaboration with ‘We Made That’, the exhibition’s designers.

Drawing on a number of archives and collections Ice Lab will include original drawings, models, photographs, films, ephemera and sources of inspiration for these highly specialised, sci-fi looking infrastructures – the closest thing to future space stations on the Moon and on Mars.

The featured projects are:

British Antarctic Survey’s Halley VI The first fully relocatable polar research station in the world became fully operational in February 2013 and signals a new dawn for 21st Century polar research. Opening 100 years after Captain Scott’s famed Antarctic expeditions, this new state of the art facility, designed by Hugh Broughton Architects and engineered by AECOM (UK) fulfils the UK’s ambition to remain at the forefront of scientific endeavour. Located 10,000 miles from the UK on a floating ice shelf, the new station is designed to be self-sufficient, able to withstand freezing winter temperatures of minus 55ºC, have minimal impact on Antarctica’s pristine environment, and be an aesthetically stimulating place to live and work.

Princess Elisabeth Antarctica
Conceived, designed, constructed and operated by the International Polar Foundation (Belgium), Princess Elisabeth is Antarctica's first zero-emission station. Perched on a nunatuk, 200km from the coast, at an altitude of 1400m, the aerodynamic stainless steel structure can withstand strong Antarctic wind, and is layered so that no form of interior heating is needed. The station seamlessly integrates renewable wind and solar energy, water treatment facilities, passive building technologies and a smart grid for maximising energy efficiency.

Bharati Research Station
India’s third Antarctic research station by bof Architekten / IMS (Germany) is a striking modernist structure made from 134 prefabricated shipping containers. Wrapped in a special aluminium case its extensive glazing offers magnificent panoramic views whilst withstanding powerful winds, below 40 degree Celsius temperatures, blizzards and unfathomable loads.

Jang Bogo
Korea is becoming a significant player in Antarctic research and Jang Bogo, by Space Group (South Korea), will be one of the largest year-round bases on the continent when it opens in 2014. The station’s aerodynamic triple-arm design will provide resistance to the elements and accommodate up to 60 personnel during the busy summer season.

Iceberg Living Station
A speculative design by David Garcia / MAP Architects (Denmark) for a future research station made entirely from ice, Iceberg Living Station negates the need to transport foreign materials to Antarctica. The station will be holed out of a large iceberg, using caterpillar excavators that are traditionally used to clear snow. It will eventually melt, resolving the issue of removing it at the end of its life course.

Publication

Accompanying the exhibition there is a publication with essays written by Dr David Walton (British Antarctic Survey and author of the recent ‘Antarctica: Global Science from a Frozen Continent’) and Sam Jacob (co-founder of FAT architects, lecturer and writer).  This is available in electronic book and print format. 

Partners and links

Commissioned and organised by the British Council and curated by The Arts Catalyst

The Lighthouse

A+DS - Architecture and Design Scotland

MOSI - Museum of Science and Industry

Torsten Lauschmann

We Made That

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